Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake (Plus Video) | Christine's Recipes: Easy Chinese Recipes | Delicious Recipes

Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake (Plus Video)

by · 23 comments
Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake01

I’m so fond of the aroma and colour of matcha (green tea). By adding a little bit of it into the cake batter, I can get a very fresh smell and lovely green colour for this marble chiffon cake. The cake is very soft and fluffy as a cloud. The marble effect is very easy to make. All I have to do is to use a pair of chopsticks to draw freely in the batter. I’d be amazed by the different patterns created every time I bake this cake. As for myself, baking this marble chiffon cake is not only cooking, but also a leisure game. There’s nothing can beat a piece of matcha cake with a cup of tea. Do you want to join in to play the drawing marble pattern game?

Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake Recipe (Printable recipe)
By Christine’s Recipes
Prep time:
Cook time:
Yield: One 20-cm (8-inch) round cake pan, removable base preferred, non-greased

Ingredients of yolk batter:
  • 90 gm cake flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 40 gm caster sugar
  • 80 ml milk
  • 60 ml vegetable oil
Ingredients of egg whites:
  • 6 egg whites
  • ½ tsp cream of tartar
  • 50 gm caster sugar
Matcha liquid:
  • 2 tsp matcha powder
  • 1 Tbsp warm water
How To Make Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake01

How To Make Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake02
Top left: beat egg whites & add cream of tartar. Top middle: add sugar.
Bottom left: add matcha liquid into one part of batter. Bottom middle: lightly stir the combined batters with chopsticks. 
Method:
  1. Preheat oven to 170C / 335F. Mix the matcha powder and warm water very well. Make sure there are no lumps at all. Set aside.
  2. Sift the cake flour and baking powder together and combine well. Set aside.
  3. Prepare the yolk batter: Mix the egg yolks with 40 grams of sugar until smooth. Pour in the milk. Combine well. Sift in the flour mixture in three additions and incorporate well. Stir in the oil bit by bit until you get a smooth batter.
  4. Prepare the egg whites: In a large clean mixing bowl, without any trace of oil or water, beat the egg whites until bubbles form. Add cream of tartar. Continue to beat until it’s well incorporated. Add one-third of the 50 grams of sugar at a time. Beat very well between the adds, until stiff peaks form. (Please refer to this video, showing how to beat egg whites, that I uploaded on youtube.)
  5. Fold in one-third of the egg whites into the yolk batter at a time. (Also, here’s a video of showing how to fold-in the egg whites). Divide the batter into two parts. Stir in the matcha liquid into one of them. Pour in the two parts of batter into a non-greased chiffon cake pan alternatively. Use a pair of chopsticks or skewer to stir the batter a few circles lightly.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes. After the first 15 minutes, reduce the oven temperature to 150C / 300F. Continue to bake until it’s cooked through. An inserted needle comes out clean.
  7. Remove from oven and immediately revert the cake pan upside down on a wire rack. Let it cook completely. Carefully remove the cake from the pan. Enjoy !
Matcha Marble Chiffon Cake02

Notes:
  • Try to get quality matcha powder that gives a vibrant green. This time I used Japanese Ujinotsuyu matcha powder (宇治綠茶).
  • Feel free to use any oil at hand as long as it doesn’t have a strong smell.

23 comments :

  1. Wow, tks Christine for sharing. I love the eveness of the cake texture. Another to do on my list. May I omit the baking powder?

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    Replies
    1. Of course, you can omit the baking powder. Make sure you don't knock out the air when fold in the egg whites and make the swirl.

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  2. I just love those green swirls...absolutely stunning!

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  3. Love that greeny color ...spongy as well

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  4. Just baked this cake. Very spongy and soft. Thanks christine for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Senses,

      Wonderful ! Thanks for trying my recipe.

      Delete
  5. Hi Christine,

    I tried a few of your recipes and I found them really nice. Would like to know if it is 170C of a fanforced or convection oven .

    Thanks,

    Lauren

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lauren,
      All oven temperatures on this blog are for conventional ovens. If fanforced mode is used, will be specified otherwise.

      Delete
  6. Hi Christine,

    Thnaks for the detailed recipe! May i know what's caster sugar? Can i replace it with normal sugar? Also, my family love green tea, it it possible to increase the amount of green tea powder?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Qi,
      Caster sugar is very fine white sugar that can be dissolved very easily. Yes, you may use normal sugar, but make sure that it's well dissolved.

      You might increase the amount of green tea powder to your liking.

      Delete
  7. What is the difference between green tea powder and matcha powder? Is it the same? Can I use green tea powder for baking?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Matcha is green tea powder, milled from shade-grown tea leaves to prevent direct sunlight, with vibrant green in colour.
      When a product is just called green tea powder, it could come from any part of the plant, not always the leaves.

      If you have green tea powder at hand, you can use it in baking. The colour of the end product would be a bit yellowish.

      Delete
  8. How about the taste between green tea powder and matcha?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Matcha is far better and has a stronger green tea aroma.

      Delete
  9. Hi Christine
    I tried your recipe today. The cake is now cooling inverted :) It rose nicely eventho I used a 10in(top)/9in(bottom) tube pan.
    The only problem I encountered was mixing the matcha paste with the final batter. The matcha paste was dry and it took me a while to mix it with the final batter. While mixing I was worried I would deflate the meringue too.. so I end up mix till there are still specks of the matcha paste and quickly pour into the baking pan.
    Any tips on mixing the paste well into the final batter without taking too much time?

    Thanks lots!! can't wait to cut the cake and see the inside haha
    Cecilia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cecilia,
      Every brand of matcha is slightly different. If your matcha paste is too dry, it needs a little bit more water to dissolve. But not too much, it will hurt the texture otherwise. The matcha paste is thick but not too dry.

      Once you get the matcha paste ready, take out a little portion of the batter to loosen it first. Then mix it with the remaining batter. It'll be much more easier to fold in well and don't need to take too long.

      Delete
  10. Hi Christine!
    Silly me! I just realised you have a video on your mixing of the matcha paste! Please ignore my earlier questions.
    Your matcha paste looks fluid. Mine was dry paste. Will add more water tomorrow when I bake again.
    Thanks!
    Warmest Regards
    Cecilia

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Christine
    I tried again. This time I added water slowly till the matcha mixture is more liquid. The cake rose beautifully. But after cooled inverted, the top aank towards center. The cake texture is dense at this sunken area but fluffy in other areas (unsunken bottom). May I ask why?
    Thx
    Cecilia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cecilia,
      Good to know that you've got your matcha paste right.
      If the texture of your chiffon cake is too dense, it's probable that the air was knocked out from the batter for some reason.

      I've put two tutorial videos about how to beat egg whites and how to fold-in the egg whites on youtube. These two steps are very crucial to make a light and fluffy chiffon cake successfully. Please click the links on this post and have a close look.
      Hope they can help.

      Delete
  12. Hi, Christine. Thank you for sharing the recipe. I tried to bake the cake but unfortunately the cake sink almost half of the height when I took out from the oven compare to the original height when it was in the oven. Could you enlightened me what did I do wrong in this case?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's highly possible that the egg whites was not beaten or folded in properly. Please check the links on the sidebar for tutorial videos.

      Delete