Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Hokkaido Milk Toast (Soft and Fluffy Bread)


Hokkaido Milk Toast01

Here comes another tangzhong recipe again, my favourite Hokkaido Milk Toast (北海道牛奶麵包). Yes, I’m really addicted to making breads with tangzhong. It’s the most reliable method to make soft and fluffy breads as far as I know. The bread can be kept for days and still very soft and fluffy. Best of all, the method is very natural, no chemicals needed.

Honestly, the tangzhong dough is extremely sticky, due to the moist added by tangzhong, so that it’s quite challenge to handle by hands. Yet, my breadmaker is very loyal and does all the hard kneading job for me.

This is a very popular Japanese style toast, with rich flavour of milk. Many fans of my Chinese blog tried this recipe were amazed with the results. Ever knew that this kind of Japanese milk toast costs very expensive in Asian bakery stores? Having got this recipe at a very handy place in my kitchen, I can bake as many as I want, for breakfasts, morning teas or afternoon teas.

Hokkaido Milk Toast (Japanese style) (Printable recipe)
Recipe adapted from 65C 湯種麵包(陳郁芬著)
By Christine's Recipes
Prep time: 15 mins
Cook time: 120 mins
Yield: Makes two loafs (each loaf tin size: 20.5cmx10.5cmx9.5cm)

Hokkaido Milk Toast01

Ingredients:
  • 540 gm bread flour
  • 86 gm caster sugar
  • 8 gm salt
  • 9 gm full cream milk power(original recipe calls for a kind of natural milk essence,
  • 11 gm instant dried yeast
  • 86 gm whisked egg
  • 59 gm whipping cream
  • 54 gm milk
  • 184 gm tangzhong (method of making tangzhong)
  • 49 gm unsalted butter, melted
Hokkaido Milk Toast Procedures01

Hokkaido Milk Toast Procedures02

Method (To make one loaf):
  1. Add all ingredients (except butter) into a breadmaker, first the wet ingredients (milk, cream, egg, tangzhong), then followed by the dry ingredients (salt, sugar, milk powder, bread flour, yeast). (Note: I used to make a small well in the bread flour, then add the yeast into it.) Select the “dough” mode (refer to the menu of your breadmaker to select the kneading dough programme). When all ingredients come together, pour in the melted butter, continue kneading until the dough is smooth and elastic. The time of kneading in the breadmaker is about 30 minutes. Then let the dough complete the 1st round of proofing, about 40 minutes, best temperature for proofing is 28C, humidity 75%, until double in size.
  2. Transfer the dough to a clean floured surface. Deflate and divide into 3 equal portions (see picture 1). Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes at room temperature.
  3. Roll out each portion of the dough with a rolling pin into an oval shape (See picture 2). Fold 1/3 from top edge to the middle and press (see picture 3). Then fold 1/3 from bottom to the middle and press (see picture 4). Turn seal downward. Roll flat and stretch to about 30cm in length (see picture 5). With seal upward, roll into a cylinder (see picture 6). With seal facing down (see picture 7), place in the loaf tins to have the 2nd round of proofing (see picture 8), until double in size. The best temperature for 2nd round proofing is 38C, humidity 85%.
  4. Brush whisked egg on surface. Bake in a pre-heated 180C (356F) oven for 30 to 35 minutes, until turns brown. Remove from the oven and transfer onto a wire rack. Let cool completely.
Hokkaido Milk Toast03

Other tangzhong bread recipes:

156 comments :

  1. Certainly is a soft-looking bread! Gotta try this tangzhong method!

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  2. That looks soooooo soft. I wish I could try making it, except I don't have a pullman's tin.

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  3. I have yet to try it. I have no bread maker.... need to do some hardcore kneading!

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  4. Mmmmm....this looks so soft and fluffy!! I've only tried one recipe for tanzhong dough recipe, but this one sounds really interesting- I've never made a bread with cream in it! It looks really good too- I'll have to try this one someday!!

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  5. wow...it looks pillowy soft and fluffy, just the kind i like! Have yet to explore this method, i'm fully convinced by your bakes ;)

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  6. Hi..
    May i know what's that thing you used on for kneading the dough? Does it comes with the bread maker? Sorry for asking such a silly question as i had never bake a bread before.

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  7. Hi Dreamz,
    You're welcome. :)
    It's called "tangzhong", basically a kind of flour paste, cooked by 1 part of bread flour with 5 parts of water.
    Here's my previous post about this amazing flour paste and how it helps produce soft and fluffy breads.

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  8. Thanks, will give it a try soon..

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  9. Can I use a kitchenaid mixer to knead the dough

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  10. Definitely one best milky loaf I have seen in a long time! Super.

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  11. That bread looks beautiful! So soft and delicate! I bet it was super tasty too!

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  12. I hope to try my hands on tangzhong bread again as the one I tried, the bread wasn't extremely soft.

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  13. It's so inspiring to see your homemade bread. It's time for me to switch on the kitchen mixer now. ;)

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  14. Wooo wooo...so pillowy soft! It is a torture when I can't eat it cos it is so far away :(

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  15. it's definitely not easy (for me) to make bread at home! you are an inspiration hehe

    btw, do you know if high protein flour is the same as bread flour? I'm getting confused with all the different answers online :)

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  16. Hi Jen,
    Bread flour is high protein flour, contains 12-14% protein.

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  17. Your bread making skill is PRFECT!! I am still yet to try the tangzhon method but your bread looks so fluffy and soft, I am totally sold!

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  18. How important is the milk powder/milk natural essence for this recipe? The only commercially available milk powder that I have seen is "skim milk powder".

    thanks!

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  19. To Anonymous,
    It adds more flavour. I think skim milk powder can't produce the rich milky flavour as expected.

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  20. I tried this bread before and love the super soft texture and milky taste. I have to try this!

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  21. the bread looks so soft, wish I can bake this too.

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  22. So soft! I'm sure eating such beautiful loaf is also addictive : ).

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  23. I love this kind of toast,
    And you're doing a super good job at it!

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  24. How did you know I wanted this recipe really badly? thanks so much! I'll be baking one this weekend in my breadmaker.

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  25. Gosh Christine - I've promised myself over and over to make this wonderful dough that you've been making. It really looks pillowy soft. I can see why you've made it so many times.

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  26. Christine, do you still have some? hikss I want this

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  27. That looks like an amazing loaf of bread! I'm not very good with baking at all and I'm so jealous!

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  28. Hi Christine, where I can buy cream milk powde? may I replace it with milk powder?

    Sarah

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  29. the 1st round proofing I used bread machine which you said it is 28 c temp. How I get 38c temp with 85 % humidity for the 2nd round proofing?

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  30. Hi Sarah,
    You can get milk powder from any supermarkets. Yes, you can omit it if you don't have.

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  31. This was my first experience making bread and it turned out wonderfully. Fortunately I inherited an unused bread machine from a friend so I didn't have to go through the pain of kneading. Thank you so much for all your wonderful recipes! You have made a lot of my childhood favorites completely accessible.

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  32. Hi Christine,
    What brand the bread maker you knead for this Japanese bread? It look great and very soft.
    I plan to follow your recipe , but is the dough work for any brand of bread maker? Mine is Kenwood.
    I did try for sweet bun, but when come to shape , it very sticky, why? can u advice me in order i can success for the bun making. Waiting your reply:)

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  33. What brand bread maker you use?

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  34. Hi christine,can i make this bread with bread machine? My bread machine is also Sunbeam, can i bake this with the 'sweet' setting?

    And,you mentioned that you knead the dough with bread machine for 30minutes,is your Sunbeam 'dough' setting for 30 minutes duration? Hhhmmm...because my Sunbeam 'dough' setting is for 1hour and 15minutes duration. Did you stop the machine after kneading for 30 minutes?

    Thanks a lot Christine - i love your blog ;)

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  35. To Anonymous,
    It's a Sunbeam.

    To Anonymous,
    Yes, you can set your breadmaker to "sweet" mode, it'd do all the jobs for you.

    Although the duration of my Sunbeam's "dough" mode is also 1hour and 15minutes, I found the kneading time only takes 20 minutes and then it rests. I tested the tangzhong dough was not good enough after 20 minutes kneading.

    So, I used to turn it off after 20 mins kneading, then turn it on again. By doing so, I get my breadmaker to knead dough straight for 30 minutes, until the dough gets enough gluten and elastic.

    You might like to get a watch and check your breadmaker, mark down how long it actually kneads dough (in "dough" mode), not include resting time.

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  36. Hi Christine I saw your beautiful art of making
    Bread and it is just a piece of art it looks so yummy
    My mother loves this bread today we found out
    She has a tumor inside her uterus and we are all
    Devistated it so happened she loves this bread
    I want to make it for her but your recipe is not in
    Cups nor teaspoons/ tablespoons if it is not to much
    To ask you can you please share and translate it
    Into cups it will be very much appreciated if it is to much
    Trouble I do understand have happy holidays to your
    Family and you. God bless. Zue

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  37. Dear Christine,
    I have one question, can we create tanzhong with whole wheat flour ? Thanks

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  38. Hi Christine, is it possible to substitute instant yeast with just active dry yeast? I can't find instant yeast in any of my grocery stores and the ones they sell online are in bulk :(

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  39. To steveng312003,
    You can. But not as soft as those used bread flour, I'm afraid.

    To Jackie,
    Yes, you can use active dry yeast instead. You have to activate before use.

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  40. To Zue,
    Sorry for missing your comment.
    Sense your love to your mother.
    Will do it and update the post with the measurements of cups/teaspoons for you once I measure all the ingredients again for you.
    In the meantime, thanks for your patience.
    Hope your mother gets well soon.

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  41. thank you so very much christine you are so great and thank you for you wishes. once again I thank you so very much. Zue

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  42. Excellent looking recipe - I'm going to whip up some tangzhong tonight to test it out!

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  43. Yes, it's me again. I wanna try this recipe out very very soon. But I've a few questions from the step to step instructions :

    Roll flat and stretch to about 30cm in length (see picture 5)---> ok I understand up till here.

    With seal upward, roll into a cylinder (see picture 6). With seal facing down (see picture 7), place in the loaf tins to have the 2nd round of proofing . ---> from here onwards, I don't realy understand. Just now in pix 4, I fold the bottom 1/3 up and press to seal, then turn seal downward. Then I roll flat to stretch to 30cm as shown in pix 5. So the question is where is the "with seal upward"? And how do I roll into a cyclinder?(sorry may sound like a silly question). Do I roll all the way? Or roll halfway from top to middle then from bottom to middle? And this will be the seal then?
    Thanks in advance for your advise.

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  44. @rachelnchong
    Let me put it in another way in short. The whole idea is to shape the dough into an oval shape first, followed by rolling it flat, fold the dough from top to bottom, you'll get a cylinder shape.

    As for your question about where the "with seal upward" is, that's before folding into a cylinder, you have to turn the seal facing upward, because you don't want the seam exposed after folding.
    Pinch the seam tightly, facing down when you place the dough into your baking tin.

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  45. Hey Christine i tried it today.
    I can it is fantastic! So soft, and it blooms like flower!

    I made abit of tweak, adding 1/4 cup extra of water, cause i felt it is too dry.
    it come out 3x the volume im so suprise!

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  46. @Munak991:
    Great to know that you like this recipe.
    The consistency of the dough might vary due to different weather conditions.

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  47. Hi Christine!
    This looks like a great recipe! :) I want to try this tomorrow! :) Just wondering - does it really need 30 mins of kneading in the bread machine? Or is it done once you can do the windowpane test? Ie it is smooth and elastic? I havent experimented this recipe yet - so maybe it will need 30mins but just wondering if there is another way to tell since different machines and modes might have different times? (I use the pizza dough mode for my kneading).

    Thanks! :)

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  48. @Elizabeth:
    The design of every breadmaker is a bit different. The reliable test is the state of the dough you knead, the time is just a reference.

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  49. Christine, Thank you very much, I love your blog :-)

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  50. @Allison Sim
    So sweet of you. Thank you for your love of my blog.

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  51. Hi Christine!

    I've tried to make this bread without bread maker, and using active dry yeast as well as all purpose flour.

    It turned out to be fine, it is soft but it is not fluffy like yours. And I baked it for more than 35 minutes, the middle part of the bread was not cooked. By any chance you know why? or if anybody experienced the same thing?

    Thanks a lot!

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  52. @Zue:
    Sorry for taking so long to convert the measurements for you, because I really want to find the best way to help. Thanks so much for your patience.
    Please check this post out. Hope it helps.

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  53. @Cynthia Gunawan:
    When it comes to making fluffy bread, the gluten in the flour is very important. Bread flour has got more protein than all purpose flour, so the breads made by bread flour is more fluffy.

    Apart from baking time, the temperature of your oven is important too. Every oven is different. You might increase the temperature a bit higher next time to see if it'd be better.

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  54. Hi Christine:
    It's me again. Just want to share my success in trying out another Tanzhong bread recipe of yours. Hurray, after my 2nd attempts, I finally baked a real soft and strong milky loaf! Thanks again.
    Here is the link: http://yinhomemade.blogspot.com/2011/03/hokkaido-milky-loaf.html

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  55. @Yin:
    Congrats! That looks gorgeous and fluffy. Great to have a cup of tea with a slice of it.

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  56. hi christine
    thanks for the recipe, the bread looks so yummy.
    i want to make one. but a smaller one loaf bread.
    if i half all the ingredient, will it turn out the same??... and can i bake it in my breadmaker?.
    thanks.

    cherry

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  57. @cherry
    Yes, the same. Half the ingrdients, use smaller baking pan, adjust the baking time accordingly.

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  58. Hi Christine,

    Thanks for all your fantastic recipes! I am tempted to buy a bread maker just for this one loaf! But seeing as I've never made bread before, I figured I'd try kneading first...But I was wondering whether it'd be possible to substitute caster sugar with regular sugar? Will there be a significant change in the texture/taste of the bread?

    Thanks,

    Nancy

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  59. @Nancy:
    It's because caster sugar is easily dissolved. I think you might use regular sugar for making this bread. Won't be any different in terms of texture and taste.

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  60. Hi Christine!

    Thank you soo much for this recipe, it tasted great! However my bread didn't turn out as fluffy as yours. I was wondering, how do you keep the dough at 28*C 75% humidity and 38*C 85% humidity?

    Many thanks,
    Alvin

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  61. Christine,
    I've made this bread three times and it finally look and tasted like yours. Thank you for the recipe!
    By the way, I didn't use caster sugar. I used regular sugar instead and it turned out fine.
    I also didn't have a bread machine so I kneaded the dough for 30 minutes by hand. I think it's time to get a machine to do the work now ^^ Thanks again for a wonderful recipe!!!

    ~ KBBQ Girl

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  62. Hi Christine,
    May I know can I substitute the whipping cream with fresh milk or cream cheese? I don't have whipping cream and I plan to make this tomorrow. Also I saw in your Chinese blog you explained how to convert normal bread making recipe to Tangzhong style. I don't quite understand. Can repeat here in English please?

    Thanks.

    Teresa

    Teresa

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  63. Christine,

    Thanks for sharing this recipe...I just tried it today...and ooohhh...it was so perfect...

    Razel from the Philippines

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  64. Hi Christine!
    It's Teresa again. You're right 汤种 style of bread is so addictive. I did this today. And it's a success again. This dough is much easier to manage (like plastercine) than the bacon & cheese loaf. But bacon & cheese loaf is softer. Thanks again! The next I'll try is the green tea red bean buns ;)

    Teresa (Singapore)

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  65. Dear Christine,
    Today I tried this recipe, after almost 6 months since the first failure! And I'm so happy because the result is terrific! Super soft and very nice taste! I'm proud of myself! Thanks a lot!

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  66. Dear Christine

    Many thanks for sharing your recipes. Made one today and absolutely loved it. you can't get any nice asian bread in Queenstown NZ!! will start trying your recipes one by one!

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  67. @Anonymous:
    I'm so happy for you too.
    Thanks for letting me know that my recipes work for you. :)

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  68. @Anonymous:
    You're welcome. Homemade breads are the best. They are straight from oven, tasty and fresh.

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  69. Just made this today and being the first time I've made dough it turned out very sloppy and sticky and hard to work with/couldn't work with! :( However they stil tasted ok.
    I'm guessing I didnt knead for long enough? Any idea roughly how long I should be hand kneading them for?

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  70. @Katy:
    It all depends on how fast and how well you knead. Some veteran bakers can knead dough within 20 minutes, but it might take an hour for new bakers.
    The goal is to knead the dough until it's not sticky, but stretchy, with enough gluten inside.

    If you have a breadmaker, it'd help a lot.

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  71. @Christine@Christine's RecipesAbove the ingredients section it says makes 2 loafs, is this correct?
    BTW great recipe

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  72. Hi Christine,

    I’ve been searching a Hokkaido bread recipe until I found your site. I have tried one recipe from the internet but it didn’t turn out like it should be. (It’s tough and dry). I thought abut giving up on this bread but then your method of making it made me want to try it again! Now this could be my problem. I am new to the bread machine. I made bread before by hand and stand mixer. I recently got a bread machine from a friend (Zojirushi BBCC-s15), which seems like a reliable brand. I was very excited to try the bread on my machine. I followed the instruction online by putting the wet ingredients then the dry, and select the dough function. After the kneading stopped (I think in about 20-25 mins), I checked the dough and felt like it wasn’t smooth like it should be so I did the windowpane test. Sure enough, it didn’t pass the test. I took it out from the pan and started kneading by hand; put it back to the machine and proof. After the resting done in about 1 1/2-2 hours (My machine has 2 resting cycle), I took it out, divided, shaped and rested for about half hour before baking it. The bread came out looking pretty but heavy and the texture was kind of dry and not fluffy. It could be that I over kneaded the dough or over proved it. Is the windowpane test always working to test machine kneaded dough? Do you think if I make only half of the recipe will allow the bread machine to knead better? Or I should just rely on the machine entirely? I felt a bit pressure using the bread machine since I don’t feel it is under my control. However, traditional bread making is quite time consuming, so it’s nice to have the machine mixes, kneads and rests the dough for you. Any advices would be appreciated. Thank you!!!

    Sara

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  73. @Sara :
    I understand how it's like when stepping out our comfort zone and try something new.
    In fact, when comes to making this tangzhong bread, I just rely on my bread machine to do the hard work of kneading for me. Kinda lazy baker, haha.
    I found the performance of every breadmaker is quite different.

    If you find the dough is still too sticky after 20mins of kneading, you might try to turn off the machine and start the programe all over again, in order to get your dough to be kneaded for the second time. That means you don't need to take out the dough and knead by hand. I tried this method before and got nicely kneaded dough.

    What I might suggest you could try next time is that get your dough kneaded in your bread machine for 2 cycles, at least 30 mins or so, then just let it stay inside to complete the 1st round of proofing, followed by rest, shaping and baking. Let's see how it goes.

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  74. Hi christine,
    Love ur blog ! Thumbs up!
    How long do u proof ur dough the second round ?
    Thanks in advance !
    Jaq

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  75. @Jaq :
    The time of the second round proofing also depends on the weather. I'd spot the size of dough, if it's doubled in size, it's done, normally about 40-45 mins. If it's warmer, it'd take shorter time.

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  76. Christine,

    Thank you so much for your advice. I finally got a soft loaf!! :D I actually made half of the recipe though. (but now I realized that it wasn't enough :( ). The bread machine works much better with smaller batch. However, I'll try your advice next time to reset the machine and start the operation all over again when I feel the dough isn't ready to proof. Do you think it will be alright if I put some sesame seeds or flax seeds to the dough? Thank you again for the great recipes!!

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  77. @Anonymous:
    It should be alright if you want to add some seeds.
    I tried adding some nuts and fruits when making this tangzhong bread. No problem.
    Happy baking!

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  78. Christine,

    What's 54gm of milk? Or is it 54ml of fresh milk?
    I'm confused. Please enlighten me. Thanks.

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  79. @Angeline
    Sorry for late reply. Just managed to measure the milk with my electric kitchen scale for you.
    54gm of milk is about 50 ml.

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  80. Angeline, SYD fm S'poreAugust 8, 2011 at 10:59 AM

    Hi Christine!

    Thanks for yr prompt reply. Was doing the calculations actually until I had a tinker. Will get an electronic scale. To make bread I think we have to. Going to start on my "adventure" now while I'm home alone. 1st time in my bread-mak'g & 1st time w my newly-bought bread maker. God bless.

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  81. Hi Christine!

    Angeline here again. So sad as my bread didn't turn out well. Was wondering if it's b'cos I turned down the oven to 120C prior to 20 mins of completion as the top of the bread had already turned brown??? The bread still smelt of dough and was heavy; not light & fluffy. Other reasons(I can think of) - my tangzhong? my proofing?? - I took double the time you indicated and weather conditions??? - it's winter now, thus, cold. Hope you have some pointers to share with what I may have gone wrong. Thanks in advance!

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  82. @Angeline:
    It sounds like that the problems of your bread were that:
    1. the dough was not kneaded enough with gluten inside, so it's dense and not fluffy.
    2. the temperature of your oven was too high, or the bread was too close to the heater, so the outside was burnt before the inside was cooked.

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  83. Hi Christine, if you turn off the dough mode after 20 min of kneading and start again, wouldn't the total kneading time be about 40 min if you let the second dough cycle complete. Would you machine be overheat. (I try the recipe today, let the bm run for 15 min then stop and restart cycle and my bm stop completely.. I have sunbeam too). thanks.

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  84. Hi Christine
    If you let your Bm knead for 20 min then restart, would the total kneading time be 40 min if you let the second cycle complete? Also would your Bm motor be overheat? I tried by recipe today, letting BM run for 15 min, stop then restart and my machine completely stop (hope it is not overheat and burn the motor completely). I have the sunbeam bm and the dough menu total time is 1:30 . Should I let the machine complete its 20 min kneading time and then knead by hand afterward? Any advise? thanks

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  85. i made this this morning and the only ingredient close enough at my supermarkets was carnation's instant non-fat dry milk. i live upstate NY, 2 hours from chinatown...my home smelled like a chinese bakery! i let my mom and sister-in-law try it and they said it tasted just like the bread/buns from chinatown! can't wait to try other recipes!

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  86. @lily c:
    Wow, that's sooo nice to read your comment.
    Then you won't drive 2 hours to china town and you can have fresh breads straight from the oven.

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  87. @Amy:
    My Sunbeam breadmaker will only knead for 20 minutes (the time of 1:30 for the dough menu includes proofing time.)
    It needs a 10-minutes wait to start the 2nd cycle, as the motor won't restart right away. I find it's ok for my machine.

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  88. Thank Christine. I think my problem is I let the BM knead for 15 min, stop then start the cycle again right away instead of waiting 10 min like you. I think my bm motor is overheated and burn out. Either that or it is old and need to retire. Thanks for your prompt reply.

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  89. @Amy
    Oh, really? That's too bad. :(
    Hope you'll find a way to fix your machine.

    The other way I sometimes use is to unplug the electric cord, that will cancel the programme memory, then the bread machine can restart right away.

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  90. Hey Christine, what could I replace the full cream milk powder with?

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  91. @Michelle:
    The milk powder is for adding more flavour. If you don't have any, you can skip it.

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  92. Hi Christine,
    Thank you for this lovely recipe:)
    I just tried this recipe yesterday, and the bread turned out really soft and fluffy.

    But I have to ask, is the bread supposed to remain as soft the following days?

    Because this morning it hardened a bit, and was not as soft as when it came out of the oven on the first day.
    Did i do something wrong?

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  93. @Veronique:
    Yes, this tangzhong bread can be kept soft for a few days.
    After the bread is cooled down, I store it in a air-tight container, lined a paper towel, then place in fridge. When I need it in the morning for breakfast, just pop it in a toast-oven/microwave oven (don't bake too long though), warm it up again. The bread often tastes like straight from the oven.

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  94. I tried the recipe a second time, and it was softer than the one before. I guess I didnt really get it the first time..
    Thank you for the tip anyway:)

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  95. Hi Christine

    Thanks for the wonderful recipe. Can I use water roux in any other regular recipe? Can you pls explain how to do that? MayBe using this recipe? Thanks so much.

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  96. Hi Christine,
    Thanks for sharing this recipe and method. I've made this a few times already and its always turned out soft. Also tried it with wholemeal flour and it works too. Like you, I used a breadmachine - much easier

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  97. Hi Christine,
    I tried this over the weekend.Oh! thank you so much for sharing... All my friends love the end product.
    I am able to enjoy more homemade and economical bread... Thanks to you!!!

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  98. @Ellen Yee
    Glad that you all loved this recipe.
    You can have fresh and soft breads straight from the oven everyday. Congrats!

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  99. Hi Christine, thank you so much for sharing this recipe.....my kids loved it! Now we can try loads of different variation. It came out really soft and fluffy, but the cooking time was only 20 mins for mine. Probably the oven although I use an oven thermometer. Nevertheless, the texture was beautiful.....worth the last 10 mins of elbow grease. I kneaded the first 20 mins using the Breville planetary mixer, it got really warm so I thought i'd better stop and give it a break.......don't wanna have nice bread but broken mixer!!!

    Regards, deb

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  100. I saw your post and interesting in trying the bread recipe. I have a question and hope you can answer. If I am using bread machine and active dry yeast, do I need to activate the yeast first (activate with warm water) before putting in the machine. Thanks.

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  101. @Jingle:
    Yes. To activate the yeast before use is a good practice, make sure they are not expired and still active.

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  102. Hi Christine,

    Need your help desperately. I had quite a few go making bread using tangzhong but unfortunately they didn't turn out fluffy... :(

    1. I used wholemeal flour as it's difficult to find bread flour where I am. Would it be a problem?

    2. I kneaded the dough for 1 hour (using the machine fortunately) but the dough was sticky & broke easily, unlike yours which was elastic & strong. I reckon this is the crucial difference.

    I really want to make this work, please help!!

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  103. @Anonymous:
    The texture of wholemeal flour is so different from bread flour. And this recipe is designed for making white bread loaf, so it can't do it in this way.

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  104. Hi! I baked this bread too. it's so easy and delicious. Thanks for all recipes, I like them very much. Greetings from Poland :)

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  105. @atina:
    Good on you.
    Thanks for letting me know how you like this recipe.

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  106. Hi Christine,

    Thanks for your reply. I found some bread flour & but the dough was still not elastic as yours. So disappointed. What is the reason for it please?

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  107. @Anonymous:
    Highly probable that your dough was not kneaded enough to generate gluten inside.

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  108. I kneaded it for an hour in the bread machine... Could it be a problem with tang zhong? I cooked it on medium heat for about 5 minutes & stopped as soon as it started to get sticky & form lines.

    Maybe there's someone in Dubai who has successfully done it...

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  109. @Anonymous:
    This recipe was tested for many times with success.

    Yes, the tangzhong is cooked and ready when you see lines formed. You might like to take a look at the picture of tangzhong posted on my previous post and see how it looks like.

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  110. @Anonymous
    May I know if you check the quantity of tangzhong you used was correct?

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  111. Thank you so much for this recipe. I've been trying to find a good recipe for a very long time.

    Can you please tell me if I can use this recipe with my breadmaker? I only have 2 settings on my machine 1.5 or 2 lbs. What's the loaf size I should set that's appropriate for this recipe?

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  112. @Anonymous:
    My breadmachine can bake a loaf up to 750 grams, ie. 1.5 lbs
    Set yours to 1.5lbs then.

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  113. Thanks for your reply. I tried your recipe with my bread machine last night. I set it with basic bread mode, but the bread didn't come out like yours. My bread is not soft and fluffy. But it's definitely softer than other bread recipe I used after I left it on the counter in a ziploc bag overnight.

    I'm just guessing... the reason my bread didn't come out is because the proofing time is not long enough, it's not proofing in the right temperature, or not enough yeast. What do you think?

    With your baking experiences, do you have any suggestions you can give me or how I can make improvement for my next attempt.

    Thank you so much for your help. Any suggestion or advice is greatly appreciated.

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  114. Hi,
    Tks for sharing a such great method . Just found yr blog a week ago and tried yr recipe on last Sat. It's so lovely .
    Iwonder if we could keep the shaped(ready for baking)dough in the fridge ovenight?

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  115. @Anonymous:
    Basically, we can put a dough in a fridge and let it proof at low temperature environment. Yet, I haven't tested the tangzhong dough with this method, can't tell how the texture would be like.

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  116. HI Christines,
    Tks for yr reply. If had a chance, will try and inf U.
    Have a lovely day

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  117. @Anonymous:
    Did your dough double in size? If so, the proofing was all right. Don't ever over-proof any bread dough.

    Just wonder if you baked it in your bread machine?
    I didn't use my bread machine to bake the bread, just used it to knead the tangzhong dough.

    The bread would be drier and harder if it's baked in the machine. That's why I turn it into my conventional oven after shaping. I can have more control of the baking time and temperature.

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  118. I made this bread yesterday and it had NOTHING to do with the bread of your picturs!!!
    WHY ARE YOU LYING ??????????????

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  119. @Anonymous:


    Hang on!

    This recipe was adapted from the cookbook, 65C 湯種麵包(陳郁芬著), as said before the recipe. And I tested it many times successfully. The recipe is excellent. Besides, I have many fans reported to me that they could make this bread with satisfied results as well. Please hop over to see the photo albums, uploaded by my fans on facebook, here and here.

    Calm down, please. Do you know what went wrong while you tried making this bread?

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  120. Hey there Annoymous, before you go off blaming Christine maybe you should think through what you did. There are so many possibilities of error such as bad ingredients, rough handling of the dough or pure carelessness. Please be polite and apologise to her.

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  121. Hi Christine:
    Just wanted to say THANK YOU and I love your recipe and all bread recipes in your website. They all came out with great success. I can say from experience that the only difference is the yeast used. I use Fleischmann's Bread machine yeast and it raise really fast in times described by you. But then I switched to Saf-Yeast and it raise twice as long but I liked the texture more. But in any instance, the bread taste great with your recipe. I subbed Butter w/ Olive Oil to cut some fat, but still great. Thanks Again!

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  122. I have tried this recipe and found it to be really good too!

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  123. hi Christine, ingore that Annoymous... ur recipes are great.. lOve the Japanese cheese cake so much.

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  124. hi Christine, ignore the Annoymous.. ur recipes are by far the 1 of the best I had tried. Keep up ur work. love u

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  125. Hi there! I've had great success making bread with your instructions on the tangzhong method. I've made the milk toast and also red bean swirl bread. I would like to make just a plain white toast though - you know the type? They usually sell it in asian bakeries - very square and thick sliced? I was wondering if I maybe put a little less sugar and perhaps no egg and replaced the milk with water if it might turn out like those breads. what do you think? Thanks!

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  126. Hi Christine,
    Your recipe was great! I tried both ways to bake in oven and bm. The oven one was ok cos I think I didn't do a good job with the oven temp worrying it would turn dark.
    The bm was wonderful! Problem is that the bread was so high up it was too much. I though it was ok since total flour content with tangzhong was about 590gm so it would be ok to bake the 1000g sweet bread. Is there anyway I can halve or 3/4 or 2/3 the recipe?? Many thanks!!

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  127. @emily
    Put less sugar, no egg, it will work as well.
    Happy baking !

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  128. @Little Tricia:
    Just scale down all the ingredients in this recipe proportionally to suit your case.
    Happy baking !

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  129. Hi Christine,
    I've try your recipe yesterday. I came out the surface is hard but the inside is OK. It like a hard crust on the bread skin. First time baking bread. Perhaps you know what wrong did I do.

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  130. Hi Christine, so if I do 2/3 of this recipe it would be 2/3 of everything including yeast, sugar and egg too right?
    Btw I used one of your other recipe for the Bacon & Cheese bread that uses 370gm of bread flour.
    It looks like the same recipe as this milk bread but I ratio out the milk to whipped cream & milk. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
    Btw the bread was excellent! My parents love it.
    You r the greatest! I'm addicted to your blog

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  131. @Little Tricia:
    Yes, scale every ingredient down to suit your machine.
    The bacon and cheese bread calls for 350grams of bread flour. Actually, they are the same kind of bread used tangzhong.

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  132. @Pui Kwan:
    It could be the temperature of your oven was too high, so the outside was hard. You might try to reduce the heat a bit, and bake for a bit longer time.

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  133. Made this last night and it's incredible! This was the first bread I've ever made that turned out great. Thank you for the great recipe and instructions. I will be making this often.

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  134. Dear Christine,

    First off, Happy CNY, Second, just made these. Thank you oh so very much for the great recipe... I'm one of your biggest fan.. it's is AMAZinG. Currently, I'm away from home (Cali) for school and this allows me to have a piece of home with me. Looking fwd to more awesome recipes from you.

    Best,
    M.Lam

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  135. I'm SO interested in making this bread! BUT it uses various milk products and we are DAIRY FREE in out house! ~___~

    Do you have any recommendations on what soy or other milk products to replace the real milk with?

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  136. Hi Christine,

    I baked this twice following your recipe but both times it didn't not turn out like yours. There were no long strands when the bread was pulled apart. The bread was soft the day it was baked but next day it was dry. I kept the bread in ziplock bags. I couldn't figure out why it wasn't soft and fluffy with long strands when pulled apart.

    Thank you

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  137. @Stephanie vB:
    As the key flavour of this bread is milk, so there're various milk products used.
    Guess soy milk might work for making this bread, although I haven't tried before.
    And you might skip the milk powder. Replace the whipping cream with water if you like.

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  138. Can we use double cream instead of whipping cream? I happen to have a jar at home that's almost out-of-date.

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  139. @winter:
    If you ask me, I won't recommend double cream as it's too thick.

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  140. Hi there... Can I use kitchenaid to knead...I have no experience with bm.. Please advice... My bread marker is kenwood

    Ann

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  141. @Anonymous:
    I tried with both of my stand mixer and bread maker, and found that bread maker performed much better than stand mixer in kneading this tangzhong dough. Having said that, you still can use your kitchenaid, but you have to keep puling down the sticky dough down the dough hook along the way of kneading.

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  142. Dear Christine, thanks for sharing your recipes! i've always loved Asian bread and you've made it so accessible and simple for me to make my own! I've tried so many of your recipes and they've turned out excellent each time! I only started baking a month ago and already i've tried baking your Nutella Coronet Horns, Palmiers, Coconut Bread, Sausage Bread, HK Cupcakes, Braided Raisin Walnut bread and just today, i've tried the Hokkaido Milk Toast bread! Almost all have turned out well! Thanks for being so inspiring and keep the recipes coming! :)

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  143. @springingmoose:
    Aww, so glad that you tried so many of my recipes and loved them all. Your feedback is very encouraging to me indeed.
    Will keep sharing what I love to cook
    Happy cooking !

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  144. @springingmoose:
    Aww, so glad that you tried so many of my recipes and loved them all. Your feedback is very encouraging to me indeed.
    Will keep sharing what I love to cook
    Happy cooking !

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  145. When I read your recipes, I want to do it right away, and.....I made it:) The bread is so good. I made the tangzhong yesterday morning and I start to make the bread at 10:00 PM same day . I have a good bead for breakfast this morning. Thank for your sharing.

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  146. @soclemlinh:
    So good to have fresh bread in the morning. Couldn't be better. :)

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  147. I'm a little late.. but thanks for this wonderful recipe and sharing the secret ingredient. just finished making my tangzhong. waiting for it to cool and then trying out the milk toast! excited! :)

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  148. Finally a bread that is soft and fluffy out from my breadmaker. Followed everything but had to halve the portion cause mine is a tiny breadmaker (Zoji brand). Hmmm Christine, would it matter if I cut the salt? I kind of think I will prefer to have a sweeter end to the bread taste.... rather than the current salt. But it is a wonderful wonderful bread!!! Yeay. Thanks to you!!

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  149. Hi Christina,

    What is 54g in Milk equivalent to ml? I see that in the other recipe for Japanese Style Bacon & Cheese Bread you put "125ml" of milk?

    Thanks
    Mabel

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  150. Hi Christine,

    Thank you very much for sharing your wonderful recipes. Someone asked this before but I didn't see an answer so here it is again ... For the 2nd proofing, what is the easiest way to achieve 38C and 85% humidity?

    Thanks,
    daisie

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  151. Hi Christine,

    Another question please ... for the tangzhong, does it have to go in the fridge and then returned to room temp before using? Can it be used after it cools to room temp from cooking ie skip the fridge stage?

    Thanks,
    daisie

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  152. Hi Christine, excited to try your recipe but have a few questions. With the melted butter, do I need to let it cool before adding to bread mixture? Secondly do I need to have all ingredients at room temp before using? Thirdly, what happens if melted butter is added with all ingredients prior to kneading?

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  153. @Joy:
    If your melted butter is too hot, let it cools down to room temperature before adding into other ingredients.
    Yes, all ingredients should be at room temperature.
    If it's too early to add butter before the dough ball is formed, it's hard to generate gluten inside.

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  154. Comments are closed. I apologize for the inconvenience.

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